Categories
Windows OS

Is Microsoft Forcing Users To Upgrade To Windows 10?

Are you receiving an error message stating, “Your PC uses a processor that is designed for the latest version of Windows…”? Recently Microsoft has taken steps to block Windows Updates from installing on computers with certain Processors that are running Windows 7 or Windows 8.X. The processors affected are 7th generation Intel i3, i5, and i7 along with Ryzan processors from AMD and the 8996 processor from Qualcomm. These are not older processors that are being phased out; that might be understandable. These are current generation mainstream processors. If you buy a new PC with an Intel processor, it will most likely have a 7th Generation iX processor in it.

Microsoft has added a document to their website which covers the error message users are receiving:

[promo]“Your PC uses a processor that is designed for the latest version of Windows. Because the processor is not supported together with the Windows version that you are currently using, your system will miss important security updates.”[/promo]

The document lists the affected processors and finally gives a resolution….upgrade to Windows 10.

Why?

Why is Microsoft blocking these updates and almost forcing users to upgrade to Windows 10? There are several reasons which we’ll outline below.

People love(d) Windows 7, even more than they love(d) Windows XP. It’s a stable operating system and users, that are already familiar with it, see little reason to change. Windows 7, as of this writing, still enjoys a sizable market share advantage over Windows 10, despite Microsoft’s aggressive upgrade campaigns.

Windows 10 was released on July 29, 2015. As of this writing, almost two years later, you can still order brand new PC’s with Windows 7 Professional licenses. Remind you, Windows 7 is now 3 Generations behind (Windows 10, Windows 8/8.X, Windows 7). The fact that Dell is still offering Windows 7 PC’s shows the popularity of the operating system. I would imagine that Microsoft’s move will stop major PC manufacturers from selling Windows 7 with PC’s that have affected processors installed. I can’t see a scenario where Dell would sell me a brand new PC that is unable to receive Windows updates.

Microsoft has planned for Windows 10 to be the “last” version of Windows. No, Windows isn’t going away, but Microsoft is shifting to a perpetual upgrade model instead of releasing new versions every few years. Microsoft claims this makes for a more stable and secure environment. The idea is that if Microsoft only has to support one environment, then the user experience will vastly improve. Right now, Microsoft is supporting Windows 7, 8, 8.1, and 10. Fast forward 10 years, Microsoft will be supporting Windows and Windows only. There won’t be other versions that people are hanging on to.

With this new plan, updates are applied across Microsoft’s entire installation base. Everyone gets the same updates, everyone is on the same version. I can certainly see how this would be easier to support than the current model. Currently, computers may have infinite combinations of Operating System versions, critical updates, important updates, and recommended updates. To take this one degree further, software developers, who currently have to account for that infinite number of OS and Update combinations, will likely welcome this development. It creates a much more consistent environment for their software to run. Instead of working with several Windows OS versions and a constant onslaught of updates, they can simply develop software for “Windows”.

Reaction

How will people react to this? There’s already plenty of uproar about Microsoft forcing updates on their users and the “Your PC uses a processor that is designed for the latest version of Windows” error message. My point of view is that it will go like most change today, there will be vocal opposition at the start, it will gradually fade away, and this model will become common and accepted. We shall see.

Conclusion

It will be interesting to see over the coming weeks and months if Microsoft sticks to its guns or if they back off their current stance. I’m certain we’ll see lots more reaction in the days ahead. If Microsoft can deliver on the promised stability and usability enhancements, it will likely be a good long term move. Although, intentionally withholding security patches and updates on brand new computers will be an uphill battle for the Microsoft PR department. Do you have a computer that is receiving the “Your PC uses a processor that is designed for the latest version of Windows” error message? Please let us know in the comments section below.

Categories
Windows 8.1

Windows 8.1 Recovery Options – Restore, Refresh, & Reset

Recovery Options

Windows 8.1 includes several Recovery Options which I believe are an improvement over Windows 7. You can access these Recovery Options by [intlink id=”7199″ type=”post”]Booting to your Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive[/intlink]. If possible, before you attempt any of these Recovery Options, make sure that you have full backups of everything on your computer. I suggest starting with the Restore option first, as it is the least invasive option. If that doesn’t solve your issue, continue on to Refresh. If you’re still stuck, Reset may be your only choice. Let’s look at each of the Recovery Options in a little more detail.

Restore

Restore is the least invasive Windows 8.1 Recovery Option. Restore uses previously created Restore Points to take your computer back in time, ideally to when your computer was working correctly. By default, Restore Points are turned on for the disk that contains your Windows installation. Whenever you install software or Windows Updates are installed, Windows 8.1 will automatically create a Restore Point. Windows 8.1 will also create a Restore Point if there hasn’t been one created in seven days. Finally, you can manually create a Restore Point from the System Protection tab of System Properties.

Windows 8.1 - Recovery Options - Create A Restore Point
Windows 8.1 – Recovery Options – Create A Restore Point

Refresh

The Windows 8.1 Refresh option begins by backing up all of your files, settings, and personalizations. It also keeps track of any Windows 8.1 Apps that you have loaded from the App Store. Refresh will then install a brand new copy of Windows 8.1. After the installation completes, it continues on to restore your backup. When everything is complete it will boot up to the login screen, you can login normally since Refresh preserves all of your User Accounts.

While the Refresh option keeps all of your settings and files, it does delete all of your installed software. During the Refresh process, Windows 8.1 creates a file named Removed Apps. This file will be on your desktop when the Refresh completes and contains a list of every application that needs to be re-installed. Microsoft does make this a little more convenient by linking the software titles to their respective website’s. Make sure you have your license keys and/or serial numbers for all licensed software you have installed. In my testing, Windows 8.1 kept all of my settings, even my Desktop Background Image, my saved Wifi Networks, and my user accounts.

Reset

The Windows 8.1 Reset option removes everything from your computer and then installs a fresh copy of Windows 8.1. This is the “nuclear option” that will erase everything on your computer and start you over from scratch. This is a last resort, if Restore and Refresh did not solve your issue, then proceed to Reset. Always make sure your backups are up to date, because you will need to restore your files from a backup after using the Reset option.

Before proceeding with the Reset option, make sure you have installation sources for your software. I also download my network and display adapter drivers to a flash drive in advance. Otherwise you’ll need another computer, with internet access, to download your network driver. Also, make sure you have serial numbers and license keys for all licensed software you’ll be re-installing. If you can’t find this information, there are many utilities (LicenseCrawlerKeyFinder, & Belarc Advisor) that will allow you to recover your serial & license numbers.

Questions About Windows 8.1 Recovery Options?

In the coming weeks, we’ll be covering each one of these options with a dedicated post that will go into much more detail. Once these #BanksTechTips posts are live, I’ll link them together in a series so they are easy to find. Have you used any of the Windows 8.1 Recovery Options? What were your thoughts? Did they work for you?

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Categories
Windows 8.1

How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive

What Is A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive

A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive is a bootable USB flash drive that you can use to troubleshoot Windows 8.1. The built-in Create A Recovery Drive tool, makes this process quick and simple. You will need at least a 512MB USB Flash Drive, a larger drive is fine but 512MB is the minimum. Make sure you don’t have any files you need on the flash drive, when you create the Recovery Drive it will be formatted and everything on the flash drive will be deleted.

The Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive gives you access to several different troubleshooting options. You can use the Recovery Drive in many of the recovery options provided by Windows 8.1, including [intlink id=”7201″ type=”post”]System Image Recovery[/intlink] and Recovery From A Restore Point. You can also use the Recovery Drive to perform Reset or Refresh operations in Windows 8.1. Lastly, you can use the Recovery Drive to access Startup Repair and Command Prompt features in Windows 8.1.

How To Create A Recovery Drive In Windows 8.1

Begin by opening up Control Panel, make sure All Control Panel Items are showing, and then click on Recovery.

How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive - Control Panel
How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive – Control Panel

Now you’ll see the Advanced Recovery Tools screen. From here, you will click on Create A Recovery Drive.

How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive - Advanced Recovery Tools
How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive – Advanced Recovery Tools

The Create A Recovery Drive window opens and gives a brief description of the Recovery Drive. Click Next to continue.

How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive - Recovery Drive
How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive – Recovery Drive

Now select the USB flash drive that you want to use for your Recovery Drive. Double check that you select the correct drive letter because everything on the flash drive will be deleted during this process. After confirming the correct drive is highlighted, click the Next button.

How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive - Select The USB Flash Drive
How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive – Select The USB Flash Drive

You’ll receive one final warning that all data on the flash drive will be deleted. Click Create to begin creating your Recovery Drive. 

How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive - Create The Recovery Drive
How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive – Create The Recovery Drive

Windows 8.1 begins creating the Recovery Drive, you’ll see a status window indicating the progress. This process only takes a few minutes.

How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive - Creating The Recovery Drive
How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive – Creating The Recovery Drive

When the process completes, you’ll receive a The Recovery Drive Is Ready message. You can click Finish to close the window.

How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive - The Recovery Drive Is Ready
How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive – The Recovery Drive Is Ready

That’s it, you now have a fully functional, bootable USB Recovery Drive that allows you to access some of the more advanced recovery features in Windows 8.1. In order to use these troubleshooting features, you must boot your computer from the Recovery Drive. To boot from the Recovery Drive, you’ll need to make sure that the Boot Order in the BIOS has USB Device before your Hard Drive. You can also access the Boot Menu from your BIOS Splash screen and choose to boot from the USB Device.

Questions About How To Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive?

Did this work for you? Did you run into any difficulties? What questions do you have about the Recovery Drive? Please ask your questions below in the comment section and I’ll be sure to answer them.

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Categories
Windows 8.1

How To: Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image

Continuing our theme of backup and recovery options in Windows 8.1, today we’re going to show you how to restore your computer using a System Image. In order to restore from a System Image, you’ll first need to [intlink id=”7105″ type=”post”]Create A System Image in Windows 8.1[/intlink]. You will also need to [intlink id=”7199″ type=”post”]Create A Windows 8.1 Recovery Drive[/intlink]. We’ll use the Recovery Drive to boot your computer into Windows 8.1 Troubleshooting options.

How To Boot To Windows 8.1 Troubleshooting Options

First, you’ll need to plug in your Rescovery Drive into a USB port on your computer. If you used an external hard drive to create your System Image, it will also need to be plugged in. If you stored your System Image on a Network Location, make sure that device is online and connected to your network.

Start your computer and immediately select the Boot Menu option. All computers should have a boot menu option, but how you access it varies by manufacturer. The most common method is by pressing one of the Function Keys as soon as you see the BIOS/Splash screen. The BIOS/Splash screen will give you instructions on which key to press. Below, I’ve listed the boot menu key for some major manufacturers.

  • HP/Compaq: F9
  • Sony: F10
  • Dell, Lenovo, and Acer: F12
  • Asus: ESC

Once you see the Boot Menu, choose the USB Flash Drive (Not your External Hard Drive) that contains your Recovery Drive and your computer will boot into Windows Troubleshooting Options.

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image

The first screen you’ll see asks you to choose your keyboard layout.

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image - Choose Keyboard Layout
How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image – Choose Keyboard Layout

Next you’ll click on Troubleshoot.

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image - Choose An Option
How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image – Choose An Option

Then click Advanced Options

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image - Troubleshoot
How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image – Troubleshoot

Click System Image Recovery

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image - Advanced Options
How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image – Advanced Options

Windows 8.1 will now search your plugged in storage devices for a System Image. The most recent System Image will be selected by default. If you’d like to choose an earlier System Image, you can choose Select A System Image and click Next.

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image - Select A System Image Backup
How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image – Select A System Image Backup

The next screen gives you additional restore options. Most users won’t need to select anything on this screen. If you have multiple hard drives and multiple partitions on your computer, you have the option to delete and format all hard drives and partitions. Normally this is not recommended. Click Next to continue.

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image - Choose Additional Restore Options
How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image – Choose Additional Restore Options

The last screen shows a summary of the System Image you are about to Restore. Make sure everything looks correct and then click Finish. 

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image - Re-Image Your Computer
How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image – Re-Image Your Computer

You’ll receive a final warning that the System Image will overwrite everything on the targeted disk(s). Click Yes to begin the restore process.

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image - Re-Image Your Computer
How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image – Re-Image Your Computer

Depending on the size of the System Image, the entire restore process can take anywhere from a few minutes to an hour or more.

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image - Re-Image Your Computer
How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image – Re-Image Your Computer

When the restore is complete, your computer will reboot.

How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image - Re-Image Your Computer
How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image – Re-Image Your Computer

The System Image restore is now complete and your computer is an exact replica of the System Image file.

System Image is by the far the quickest way to get a crashed computer up and running again. Since a System Image is an exact copy of your hard drive(s), it contains all of your programs, files, documents, settings, etc. Your backup plan should include creating System Images on a regular basis.  System Images are a great way to restore your entire system, but you cannot restore individual files or documents using a System Image. You should combine your System Image backups with regular file backups using [intlink id=”7025″ type=”post”]Windows 8.1 File History[/intlink]. This will give you the ability to restore your entire system or just a few files that may have been lost.

Questions about How To Restore Windows 8.1 With A System Image?

What questions do you have about Restoring Windows 8.1 With A System Image? Please ask your questions below in the comment section and I’ll be sure to answer them.

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Categories
Windows 8.1

Create A System Image in Windows 8.1

How To Create A System Image in Windows 8.1

Yes, a System Image backup is still available in Windows 8.1. Yes, Microsoft did hide it pretty well. With cloud storage becoming prevalent, Microsoft is moving (pushing?) users away from the conventional PC backup. Only a few years ago, everyone was encouraged to keep meticulous backups. In the event of a drive failure or a particularly insidious virus, unless you had good backups, your data was lost. Microsoft’s current idea is that users should be storing their documents, pictures, music, etc. in the cloud. If you lose a hard drive or have some other type of failure, the OS can be restored, legacy programs re-installed (Cloud Apps require little if any installation), and you can find everything else you need in SkyDrive, Google Drive, DropBox, etc. It sure does sound nice, doesn’t it?

Don’t get me wrong, I rely on the cloud heavily. I store as much as possible in Google Drive. I use Google Docs exclusively, I haven’t used Microsoft Office in years. However, whether it’s out of habit or laziness, I still have files on my desktop. I have PDF files that haven’t quite made it to Google Drive. I have notes that were typed in Notepad that I haven’t put into Evernote yet. I have archived files from an old computer that I haven’t moved to my NAS storage. In other words, I still need good backups (and to optimize some of my workflows!).

In addition to backing up with the [intlink id=”7025″ type=”post”]Windows 8 File History[/intlink] feature, which works well and allows you to easily [intlink id=”7091″ type=”post”]Restore Your Files[/intlink], I like to create an entire System Image once per month. Let’s look at how that is done in Windows 8.1.

Begin by opening the Control Panel and then clicking on File History. In the lower left hand corner of the File History window, you’ll see System Image Backup.

Create A System Image - Windows 8.1 - File History
Create A System Image – Windows 8.1 – File History

When you click on System Image Backup, a new window will open and you’ll be presented with three options for where you’d like to store your system image.

  • On a hard disk
  • On one or more DVDs
  • On a network location

Note: You cannot store a System Image on your System or C: drive. You will need a second hard drive or an external hard drive.

Create A System Image - Windows 8.1 - Create A System Image
Create A System Image – Windows 8.1 – Create A System Image

How To Store A System Image On A Network Location

To store your system image on a network location, select the appropriate radio button and then click Select to browse for the location. You may also need to enter network credentials to connect to the device.

Create A System Image - Windows 8.1 - Create A System Image
Create A System Image – Windows 8.1 – Create A System Image

Click OK and then you’ll be back at the initial Create A System Image window, with the network location filled in.

Create A System Image - Windows 8.1 - Create A System Image
Create A System Image – Windows 8.1 – Create A System Image

Click Next and you’ll be presented with a screen confirming all of your settings. This screen will also give you the approximate size of the System Image. Click Start Backup and Windows will begin creating the System Image. Note: Windows will not allow more than one System Image per disk. If there is an existing System Image on the disk you are trying to backup to, you will need to delete it before creating a new one.

Create A System Image - Windows 8.1 - Create A System Image
Create A System Image – Windows 8.1 – Create A System Image

Finally, you’ll see a Create A System Image window with a status bar indicating the progress. The System Image backs up everything on your computer, as a result the files can be very, very large. If you are backing up to a network location, I highly suggest you use a wired (instead of wireless) connection to your network and give your computer overnight to complete the task.

Create A System Image - Windows 8.1 - Create A System Image
Create A System Image – Windows 8.1 – Create A System Image

What questions do you have about creating a System Image? Please post in the comment section below and I’ll do my best to answer your questions.

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Categories
Windows 8.1

Restore Files With Windows 8 File History

Now that we know what [intlink id=”7025″ type=”post”]Windows 8 File History[/intlink] is, let’s get into the meat and potatoes of File History and learn how to restore files with Windows 8 File History in the event of a crash, deleted file, corrupt file, etc.

How To Restore Files With Windows 8 File History?

To begin, open up File History from the Control Panel. In the left hand column you’ll see the option for Restore Personal Files.

Restore Files With Windows 8 File History - File History
Restore Files With Windows 8 File History – File History

Now you’ll be presented with a new window that shows all of the folders from which you can restore files with Windows 8 File History.

  • First, in the upper left, you’ll see a time and date stamp. The time and date-stamp indicate that the files and folders listed below are available to be restored to the condition that they were in at that particular time.
  • Second, at the top of the window in the center, you’ll see the number of versions available in File History. In this example I have 31 different versions available for me to restore.
  • Third, at the bottom of the window, you’ll see three buttons. The left and right arrows will scroll through the different versions of your files. The center button, the curved arrow, will restore the selected files and folders.
Restore Files With Windows 8 File History - File History -> Restore Files
Restore Files With Windows 8 File History – File History -> Restore Files

In this example, you can see that we’ve used the left arrow button to scroll back to an earlier time-stamp in my File History. From here we can pick the files and/or folders that we want to restore.

Restore Files With Windows 8 File History - File History -> Restore Files
Restore Files With Windows 8 File History – File History -> Restore Files

Now that you’ve decided from when you want to restore, navigate through the available files and folders to find exactly what you want to restore. Once you’ve located your files and folders, simply highlight the file/folder you want to restore and then click the restore button.

Restore Files With Windows 8 File History - File History -> Restore Files
Restore Files With Windows 8 File History – File History -> Restore Files

If you’re restoring an earlier version of a file that still exists in the same location on your computer, you’ll be presented with a few options:

  • If you want to replace the existing file with the previous version, just click Replace.
  • If you only want to restore files that no longer exist on your computer, click Skip This File and newer files on your computer will not be replaced.
  • Finally, you can click Compare Info For Both Files to see more information, such as time-stamps and file size, to help make your decision. Make your selection and then click Continue. Note: you have the option to keep the existing file and also restore the version from File History. In this case, Windows will append a number to the end of the restored file.
Restore Files With Windows 8 File History - File History -> Replace or Skip Files
Restore Files With Windows 8 File History – File History -> Replace or Skip Files
Restore Files With Windows 8 File History - File History -> File Conflict
Restore Files With Windows 8 File History – File History -> File Conflict

If the file that you chose to restore, no longer exists in the same location on your computer. You’ll see a file copy window that gives you status information on the restore. Once the file copy is complete, your file has been restored and is ready for use.

Restore Files With Windows 8 File History - File History -> Restore Process
Restore Files With Windows 8 File History – File History -> Restore Process

Should I Use Windows 8 File History

So all of this information is great, but should we really use Windows 8 File History or are there better options out there? You’ll find countless debates all over the internet discussing pro’s and con’s of File History. I’ll make it really simple, Windows 8 File History is a good backup option for the average user. Notice I said good and not great. File History does have some downsides. It struggles with files that have been renamed. It doesn’t have the option to immediately backup changed files. It only backs up files and folders that are in your User account’s Libraries.

For most users the upside (a consistent backup that requires no user involvement…and it’s free!) will far outweigh any of the shortcomings in File History. However, more advanced users with critical data will want to look elsewhere for a more robust backup solution. We’ll be reviewing some of these options in upcoming posts.

Bottom line: any backup solution is better than no backup solution. As the saying goes, “Don’t let the perfect be the enemy of the good.”

Questions About How To Restore Files With Windows 8 File History?

What questions do you have about restoring your files with File History? Post questions and in the comments section below and I’ll be sure to answer them.

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Categories
Windows 8.1

Windows 8 File History

What Is Windows 8 File History?

For everything that is wrong with Windows 8, there are several things Microsoft did right. The new File History feature is one of those things. File History has its roots in Previous Versions, a  similar feature found in Windows 7 along with Windows Vista and Windows Server 2003. Windows 8 has taken the relatively unknown Previous Versions, made it more robust, slapped a new name on it, and brought it to the forefront. Mac Users will recognize File History as being very similar to Time Machine in OS X.

What Is Versioning?

The beauty of File History is that it uses a technology called Versioning. Whenever you make a change to a file and save it, a new version of that file is created. Versioning allows you to revert back to previous iterations of your file. Imagine a scenario where you accidentally made changes to a template that your company uses on a regular basis. File History gives you the option to see the previous versions of the file in question and allows you to pick which one you would like to restore. If you change your mind and decide you want the most current version, you can simply restore again.

What Does File History Backup?

File History looks at your User folders and takes hourly (by default) snapshots of your files. The files are then saved to another hard drive or a network storage location. File History does not backup your entire computer, it only looks at files and folders under your user profile. These folders include: Libraries (including Documents, Music, Pictures, and Videos), Desktop, Favorites, and offline OneDrive files/folders. Within these locations, you can Exclude Folders if you choose.

How Do I Open File History?

To open File History, first open the Control Panel and then click on File History.

Screenshot - Windows 8.1 - Control Panel
Screenshot – Windows 8.1 – Control Panel

How Do I Turn On File History?

The next step is to turn on File History. If you already have an external hard drive plugged in, it will most likely show up in the Copy Files To area. If that’s the case you can simply click Turn On and File History will go to work and begin copying your files.

Screenshot - Windows 8.1 - File History
Screenshot – Windows 8.1 – File History

If you don’t see your external hard drive listed, or would like to use a Network Location, click the Select Drive option. You can now choose the appropriate drive or select a network location for your backup.

Screenshot - Windows 8.1 - File History -> Select Drive
Screenshot – Windows 8.1 – File History -> Select Drive

Once File History has been turned on the header will turn green and you’ll see a message indicating that your files are being copied.

Screenshot - Windows 8.1 - File History
Screenshot – Windows 8.1 – File History

How Do I Exclude Folders From File History?

Excluding folders from File History is simple. Click on Exclude Folders and you’ll have the option of adding folders that you do not wish to backup.

Screenshot - Windows 8.1 - File History -> Exclude Folders
Screenshot – Windows 8.1 – File History -> Exclude Folders

How Do I Customize My File History Settings?

Advanced Settings allows you to customize your File History settings. You can change the interval that File History uses, anywhere from 10 minutes to once per day. You can choose a size limit for your File History cache, settings range from 2% up to 20% of available disk space. Finally you can choose how long to keep older versions of your files. For this option you can choose Until Space Is Needed or Forever. There are also time-based options that range from 1 month to 2 years.

Screenshot - Windows 8.1 - File History -> Advanced Settings
Screenshot – Windows 8.1 – File History -> Advanced Settings

File History is a great tool to keep your files safe. Once setup, it works silently in the background without requiring any interaction from users.

Questions about Windows 8 File History?

What questions do you have about File History? Post questions and in the comments section below and I’ll be sure to answer them.

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